AR/VR Are All the Rage, Right?

I couldn’t help but chuckle as I watched Industrial Light & Magic’s VR demo at WWDC last week. These guys are crazy talented but you could tell they weren’t the best on stage. Don’t get me wrong, it’s incredible that the new iMac can power virtual reality. I giggled to myself because I don’t see the practical adoption of VR for the general public. 🤓

This past week, Stowe Boyd wrote a fascinating piece called Six Points On The Map Of Emerging Tech. Boyd surveyed CIOs, CTOs, and senior IT-execs to measure Importance versus Adoption. Participants ranked emerging technologies as very, somewhat, not very, or not at all important to them. If you can’t find VR/AR it’s because it’s way down near the bottom.

Boyd then took the top six technologies reported and added their adoption rates.

Conclusion

In our industry, it’s easy to get wrapped up in the latest gadgets and assume everyone will want to use them. The reality is that most consumers take a wait-and-see approach. Brands are the same way with their budgets. A small number of brands will innovate and be first to market, and then the rest will follow later on.

Mass market adoption of VR will happen, but it’s going to grow through the gaming industry first. Earlier this year Sony reported it’s Playstation VR sold 915,000 headsets in the first four months. Sony’s price point ($499) and not needing a high-end gaming PC contributed to the strong start. The holy grail for the market is a VR experience without the headgear.

AR, on the other hand, is going to take great strides this year. It’s a logical next step for consumers because all they need is their phone.

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